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News

Sunday Puzzle-22

User Rating: / 1
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 30 September 2012
Image
Puzzle courtesy of Barry R. Clarke, columnist for The Daily Telegraph and international puzzle expert

A Pressing Problem


http://www.pogonina.com/images//pressingprob.jpg

The Department of Silly Ideas has 16 push buttons on the front door arranged in a 4×4 square as shown. Each button is lit in one of the four colours in the rotating sequence: blue, red, yellow, green. When a button is pressed, its colour moves one forward in the sequence (e.g. pushing red makes it yellow, pushing green makes it blue etc.). In addition, three pairs of buttons each  have an internal relationship where one button controls the colour of the  other one but not vice versa. When the controlling button of the pair is  pushed, its colour moves one forward while the controlled button colour moves  one backwards. In the panel shown above, B1 controls C3, A3 controls D1 and  D2 controls B4. So, for example, pressing A3 sends A3 from blue to red and D1  from green to yellow. However, pressing D1 just sends D1 from green to blue. 
  
Now entry into the department is gained by producing the same colour for all the buttons. What is the smallest number of button pushes required to gain entry?


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Last Updated ( Sunday, 30 September 2012 )
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FIDE October 2012 Rating List

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Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 30 September 2012
http://www.pogonina.com/images/stories/fidelogo.jpg

FIDE has published the official October 2012 rating list. Last month there were 44 players in the 2700+ pool, this time there are 51. This looks like an all-time record, although we didn't perform a detailed background check:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/68/David_Navara_08.jpg/220px-David_Navara_08.jpg
A good month for David Navara: the Czech GM increased his ELO by an amazing 31 points

Rank Old
Rank
Name Country Title Rating Old
Rating
Games
  1 1 Carlsen, Magnus NOR GM 2843   2843 0
  2 2 Aronian, Levon ARM GM 2821 +5 2816 10
  3 3 Kramnik, Vladimir RUS GM 2795 -2 2797 9
  4 4 Radjabov, Teimour AZE GM 2792 +4 2788 9
  5 5 Nakamura, Hikaru USA GM 2786 +3 2783 9
6 7 Karjakin, Sergey RUS GM 2780 +2 2778 10
7 6 Anand, Viswanathan IND GM 2780   2780 0
  8 8 Caruana, Fabiano ITA GM 2772 -1 2773 9
  9 9 Ivanchuk, Vassily UKR GM 2771 +2 2769 10
  10 10 Morozevich, Alexander RUS GM 2758   2758 0
11 14 Kamsky, Gata USA GM 2755 +9 2746 11
12 11 Grischuk, Alexander RUS GM 2752 -2 2754 11
13 12 Topalov, Veselin BUL GM 2751 -1 2752 10
14 23 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar AZE GM 2748 +19 2729 10
  15 15 Wang, Hao CHN GM 2748 +6 2742 10
16 13 Svidler, Peter RUS GM 2747   2747 0
  17 17 Gashimov, Vugar AZE GM 2737   2737 0
18 16 Gelfand, Boris ISR GM 2736 -2 2738 8
19 22 Ponomariov, Ruslan UKR GM 2735 +6 2729 10
20 24 Dominguez Perez, Leinier CUB GM 2734 +9 2725 10
21 18 Leko, Peter HUN GM 2734 -3 2737 10
22 32 Wojtaszek, Radoslaw POL GM 2733 +20 2713 13
23 25 Jakovenko, Dmitry RUS GM 2732 +8 2724 9
24 20 Giri, Anish NED GM 2730   2730 7
25 27 Volokitin, Andrei UKR GM 2724 +6 2718 9
26 57 Navara, David CZE GM 2722 +31 2691 14
27 26 Adams, Michael ENG GM 2720 -2 2722 10
28 21 Tomashevsky, Evgeny RUS GM 2720 -10 2730 5
29 30 Shirov, Alexei LAT GM 2718 +4 2714 10
30 28 Andreikin, Dmitry RUS GM 2718   2718 0
  31 31 Bruzon Batista, Lazaro CUB GM 2717 +4 2713 21
32 44 Malakhov, Vladimir RUS GM 2713 +13 2700 14
33 34 McShane, Luke J ENG GM 2713   2713 0
34 37 Riazantsev, Alexander RUS GM 2712   2712 0
35 61 Cheparinov, Ivan BUL GM 2710 +21 2689 24
36 43 Areshchenko, Alexander UKR GM 2710 +8 2702 19
37 19 Jobava, Baadur GEO GM 2710 -24 2734 10
38 33 Almasi, Zoltan HUN GM 2707 -6 2713 10
39 49 Short, Nigel D ENG GM 2707 +9 2698 10
40 48 Polgar, Judit HUN GM 2705 +7 2698 10
41 50 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime FRA GM 2705 +8 2697 10
42 39 Bacrot, Etienne FRA GM 2705   2705 0
43 40 Korobov, Anton UKR GM 2705   2705 0
44 36 Naiditsch, Arkadij GER GM 2704 -8 2712 10
45 42 Nepomniachtchi, Ian RUS GM 2704   2704 0
46 53 Le, Quang Liem VIE GM 2703 +10 2693 14
47 63 Akopian, Vladimir ARM GM 2703 +16 2687 10
48 52 Ding, Liren CHN GM 2702 +8 2694 14
49 29 Fressinet, Laurent FRA GM 2702 -12 2714 10
50 51 Vallejo Pons, Francisco ESP GM 2700 +3 2697 11
51 45 Moiseenko, Alexander UKR GM 2700 +1 2699 7

Notably, Akopian and Cheparinov are back in the 2700+ club after a few years of absence. Ding Liren enters it for the first time.

Top results: Navara +31, Cheparinov +21, Wojtasjzek+20, Mamedyarov +19, Akopian +16, Malakhov +13, Quang Liem +10
Severe losses: Jobava -24, Tomashevsky -10

Here is the updated list of all-time rating records

Now let's take a look at the women's rating list:

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Last Updated ( Sunday, 30 September 2012 )
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Missed Chess Tactics

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Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 29 September 2012


Magnus Carlsen (2843) - Levon Aronian (2816), 2012
Black to move

Levon Aronian missed an elegant line that leads to a win for Black. The game ended in a draw. Can you help the world's #2 beat the world's #1?

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Last Updated ( Saturday, 29 September 2012 )
 

Chess Insight from GM Pavel Maletin

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Written by Administrator   
Friday, 28 September 2012



Grandmaster Pavel Maletin

Highest FIDE rating: 2636, current - 2587


Editors note: GM Pavel Maletin kindly agreed to publish the analyses of his games at Pogonina.com. This way he is following Mikhail Botvinniks advice to masters comment on your games in public and accept critique in order to improve. The author hopes that his notes will be interesting to you. Any chess feedback is welcome!


I would like to begin with a tournament that I have recently played in Vladivostok, Russia (one of the stages of the Russian Cup in classical chess - Pogonina.com). Overall, my play there was so-so. However, when I was going through some of the game fragments during the flight, strangely enough, I came to a conclusion that there are some things worth boasting about. For example, I have played a rather high-quality game with IM Semeniuk. It will be the subject of todays article. By the way, one (especially me) rarely cant beat a 2400+ by playing nearly exclusively first and second-line (in unforced situations) moves according to the engine. Maybe
the Soviet chess school actually counts for something 

Click here to view the game analysis


A nice game, although not rich in content after all, starting from a certain point all the moves were forced. Nevertheless, the tactical fight looks rather refreshing to me. Also, imho, I performed well after the opening. Overall, this is definitely the best game I have played in the tournament in terms of quality.

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Last Updated ( Friday, 26 April 2013 )
 

New Natalia Pogonina Wallpaper

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Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 27 September 2012
http://www.pogonina.com/images/trueimg/pictures/33/E8D780A52F41-33.jpg

The one thing I don't understand is what that Korchnoi's quote is doing on top of the picture

Other Natalia Pogonina wallpapers

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Last Updated ( Saturday, 20 October 2012 )
 

Chess Week on Twitter

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Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 27 September 2012
Pogonina.com offers you a selection of some of the most informative chess tweets from last week. All the fresh chess news in one short post:

Muzychuk is leading the Women's Grand Prix in Ankara after 9 rounds

http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270901.jpg
Carlsen, Aronian, Karjakin, Caruana, Anand and Vallejo are playing in Bilbao Masters Final
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270902.jpg
Sergey Karyakin: Today I have proved that I still know a bit about playing chess. Tomorrow is a rest day, and then a game against the World Champion! Life is not getting easier! :)

An expert opinion about endgame skills of MC

http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270903.jpg
Nice picture
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270904.jpg
http://www.pogonina.com/images//arobasket.jpg

Quote of the week
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270905.jpg
Congrats, Sam!
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270906.jpg
The message is understandable, but why pick on Siberia?
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270907.jpg
The proper way to greet chess players at home
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270908.jpg
Hope for the best, prepare for the worst
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270909.jpg
Who will be the new ECF President?
http://www.pogonina.com/images//twit270910.jpg

Have we missed some of the best tweets? You can contribute to our next top-10 stories chart by retweeting the post you like and adding @Pogonina to the message so that we can see it.


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Last Updated ( Thursday, 27 September 2012 )
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FIDE Grand Prix: Call for a Fair Selection Process

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Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 26 September 2012


Originally published at ChessBase

Womens chess is relatively neglected as compared to mens. If you ask a typical chess fan what the Womens Grand Prix is and who qualifies for it, the answer will usually be silence.
 

As of now, the FIDE Womens Grand Prix is a series of round robin tournaments with nice cash prizes and opportunities to increase ones mastery by facing other strong grandmasters. One of the main goals of holding these events is to determine the Challenger, i.e., a female player who will face the winner of the Womens World Cup for the Womens World Chess Champion title. Therefore, in some sense the Grand Prix is the semi-final of the World Championship, because winning it entitles one to play the final match for the crown.
 

It is hard to follow the Womens World Chess Championship Cycle, so here is a quick reminder:
 

  1. The current champion is Hou Yifan from China. She has also secured the first place in the Womens Grand Prix series.

  2. The Womens World Chess Championship will take place in November 2012 in Khanty-Mansyisk, Russia. If Hou Yifan defends her title there, she will play in 2013 a match against the lady (Challenger) who finishes second in the Womens Grand Prix series. If Hou loses her title in November, she will challenge the new champion, because she has qualified for the match via the Grand Prix series.


Naturally, one would expect only the best of the best players to qualify for the Grand Prix circuit on the basis of their career achievements and playing strength. However, lets take a look at the list of the participants and indicate on what grounds the players have been invited:

 

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Last Updated ( Wednesday, 26 September 2012 )
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Survey among Top Players about Time Control

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Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 25 September 2012
Open letter, published as it is:

 

 

 

The Association of Chess Professionals has recently conducted a survey (composed of 4 questions) among Top 30 players in the world (as of 1 July 2012) about the time control in World Championships.


We have received 28 answers from:
 

Adams Michael, Anand Viswanathan, Aronian Levon, Bologan Viktor, Carlsen Magnus, Caruana Fabiano, Dominguez Perez Leinier, Fressinet Laurent, Gashimov Vugar, Gelfand Boris, Grischuk Alexander, Ivanchuk Vassily, Jakovenko Dmitry, Jobava Baadur, Kamsky Gata, Karjakin Sergey, Kramnik Vladimir, Leko Peter, Mamedyarov Shakhriyar, Nakamura Hikaru, Nepomniachtchi Ian, Ponomariov Ruslan, Radjabov Teimour, Riazantsev Alexander, Svidler Peter, Tomashevsky Evgeny, Wang Hao, Wojtaszek Radoslaw.


Question 1:

Which of the following 2 time controls should be used in final stages of World Championship Cycles?

a) 120'/40+60'/20+(15'/SD+30") - 120 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 60 minutes for 20 moves, followed by 15 minutes, with an increment of 30 seconds starting from move 61

b) (100'/40+50'/20+15'/SD)+30" - 100 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 50 minutes for 20 moves, followed by 15 minutes, with an increment of 30 seconds starting from move 1


Results:
9 voted for A
17 voted for B
1 player equally liked both proposals
---

1 player was against both proposals


Question 2:

The following 2 rapid time controls are widely used. Which of them should be used in World Rapid Championships?

a) 15'+10" - 15 minutes for a game with 10 seconds increment
b) 25'+10" - 25 minutes for a game with 10 seconds increment

Results:
8 voted for A
19 voted for B

---

1 player was against both proposals


Question3:

The following 3 blitz time controls are widely used. Which of them should be used in World Blitz Championships? Please sort the possibilities from best to worst.
a) 5'
b) 3'+2"

c) 4'+2"

Results:
Answer A: 2 first places; 2,5 second places; 23,5 third places
Answer B: 16 first places; 9,5 second places; 2,5 third places
Answer C: 10 first places; 16 second places; 2 third places

Remark:

0,5 arises when a player doesn't give a preference between 2 possibilities.


Question 4:

The following 5 time controls are widely used for sudden death games. Please sort them from best to worst.

a) 5'-4' (white has 5 minutes, black has 4 minutes; white has to win)
b) 6'-5' (white has 6 minutes, black has 5 minutes; white has to win)

c) (4'-3')+1" (white has 4 minutes, black has 3 minutes, an increment of 1 second is added starting from move 1; white has to win)

d) (5'-4')+1" (white has 5 minutes, black has 4 minutes, an increment of 1 second is added starting from move 1; white has to win)

e) (5'/60-4'/60) + (0'/SD+3") (white has 5 minutes, black has 4 minutes, an increment of 3 seconds is added starting from move 61; white has to win)

Results:
Not all out of 28 players answered that question.

The opinions were widely spread, however it is still possible to take a conclusion, that the option 5'-4' (white has 5 minutes, black has 4 minutes; white has to win) was clearly preferable, whereas all other 4 options were at more or less the same level of support.


Recommendations:

Based on the obtained results the ACP recommends:

1) to change the official time control used in the World Championship match/tournament, Candidates matches, Grand Prix to:
(100'/40+50'/20+15'/SD)+30" - 100 minutes for 40 moves, followed by 50 minutes for 20 moves, followed by 15 minutes, with an increment of 30 seconds starting from move 1

2) to use in the World Rapid Championship:
25'+10" - 25 minutes for a game with 10 seconds increment

3) to use in World Blitz Championship:
3'+2" - 3 minutes for a game with 2 seconds increment

4) to use 5'-4' (white has 5 minutes, black has 4 minutes; white has to win) for sudden death games


Acknowledgements:

The ACP would like to thank all the top players for taking part in the survey and for all additional comments that we have received.

Bartlomiej Macieja

ACP General Secretary

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Last Updated ( Tuesday, 25 September 2012 )
 

Olympiad 2012: In the Middle

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Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 25 September 2012
http://www.pogonina.com/images/stories/1331194621_b_natalja-pogonina-2.jpg
by Natalia Pogonina for her
Chess.com Tuesday column


Round 5 was the last one before the first rest day. We were paired with the co-leader, France (8 match points). I had a free day. When everyone left the hotel, the Internet finally started working fine. I managed to watch a movie online and then went to the playing hall myself to cheer up my teammates. At first we were under some pressure, but then important victories came on boards 3 and 4. Tatiana Kosintseva drew Elmira Skripchenko on board 1. The game between Sophie Milliet and Valentina Gunina was a real thriller. Valya messed up in the opening and had a lost position. Then her opponent failed to find the mating attack and even got a worse position. After the time control was reached the the position was objectively drawn, but Gunina started playing too ambitiously and lost. We won the match 2.5-1.5.


olart1.jpg

In a good mood before the match

The Chinese team convincingly beat India 3.5-0.5. Another good time to remind you that Humpy Koneru wasnt participating in the Olympiad.

 



Every day there was press conferences with players, coaches and other interesting people. This time all the three Polgar sisters reunited:

olart2.jpg

At the Istanbul Olympiad there was a video broadcast from the playing hall with audio commentary. Additionally, many websites used to have their own online commentary. We also had a very detailed live report on both the Open and Womens sections each day with pics and game updates. Check out Pogonina.com if you are interested in re-living those moments.
 

We decided to spend the rest day before a critical match vs. China by visiting the downtown of Istanbul Sultanakhmet square. Valentina Gunina preferred to stay at the hotel, but we were joined by the captain of the mens team Yuri Dokhoian. To become more familiar with the place, we didnt take a taxi and traveled by subway and tram.

olart3.jpg

On our way

We had a nice meal at a local restaurant and went sight-seeing:

olart4.jpg

Can you guess the average rating of the people on the picture? :)

Then we took a walk on the wharf and returned home by about 5 p.m. Time to prepare for our match with the Chinese ladies!

The rest day flew by quickly and entertainingly. We had a one match point advantage over China, so we werent in a must-win situation. At the previous Olympiad we barely won the match, but at the World Championship11 the powerful Chinese girls crushed our team 4-0. Naturally, we were rather motivated to do well this time.

The confrontation went tough for us. Tatiana Kosintseva quickly lost an opening duel against Hou Yifan. I messed up the moves and got an unclear position instead of a better one. The game ended in a draw. Sasha Kosteniuk had a slightly worse endgame, but managed to hold. Nadya won a piece, but it was not so easy to convert it. Kudos to her for winning the game. The match ended in a tie: 2-2.



olart5.jpg

Sergey Rublevsky is cunningly looking at the Chinese players

olart6.jpg

The Chinese ladies are having a friendly chat

Poland defeated Serbia and caught up with us on match points. An interesting endgame occurred on board 4:


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Last Updated ( Tuesday, 25 September 2012 )
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Guess the Players-73

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Written by Administrator   
Monday, 24 September 2012


a) Can you name the players?
b) Make an intelligent guess at their average FIDE rating

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Last Updated ( Monday, 24 September 2012 )
 
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